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Bee Line

The house: 16 Tuthill Lane, Remsenburg, New York

The agents: Saundra C. Parola and William F. LeMaire

The broker: Brown Harris Stevens

Nick Churton of Brown Harris Stevens’ London office finds a house that would be just at home in Surrey, England as it is in the Hamptons, New York.

When it comes to choosing a great nesting site, you can’t beat an osprey. I was reminded of this when I recently visited a jewel of a house in the Hamptons, that celebrity haunt on the south fork of Long Island, New York. On top of one spectacular chimney was an osprey’s nest and atop that was an osprey. Yes, raptors, especially ospreys, have a keen eye for great real estate.

But who put that chimney there first, and when, for that was pure vision? The answer is architect Gordon Bee Dudley with EW Howell Construction Group, a name behind many notable New York buildings. The year was 1934.

The house, which occupies three floors, has about 6,770 square feet of living space containing seven bedrooms and seven bathrooms, formal living and dining rooms, a library, an updated kitchen, a family room and an office. The style is unmistakably Tudorbethan, and the condition is remarkable.

Outside, in almost 14.5 acres of meticulously landscaped and secluded grounds are formal gardens, a new pool, a pond and numerous outdoor entertaining areas.

Again, if you want a good location, follow the ospreys. This property is near the ocean and beaches and is also on the western edge of the celebrated Hamptons. This location makes it easier to get to and from Manhattan than some other Hamptons’ haunts – only about two hours’ drive away – something you’ll undoubtedly be delighted about come the weekends and holidays.